Digital locks invading libraries

Canada’s House of Commons resumes next week with continued hearings on the new copyright bill, C-32.

Some elements of it make me smile, others make me frown. I won’t go into the stupidity of protecting digital locks as some add-on to existing copyright protection. I’ll just keep that in this one paragraph with a hasty analogy: if somebody is trespassing, should the owner of the property claim extra damage because the trespasser also went around an electric fence? Ergo, should everyone put up an electric fence to be fully compensated in the event of a break-in?
(Not that ignoring copyright is anything like breaking into somebody else’s property, of course)

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Another reason why free software works (if there aren’t enough already)

I was really pleased with how my little forum post worked out, so I’m dumping it here as well!

Here is the catch that makes the free software platform so awesome: No one entity owns the whole of an end product like Ubuntu or ever will. (Same with all the individual projects it mirrors). There are contributions from everywhere, including groups that conventional businesses would label competitors. Heck, the sudo program is sponsored by DARPA and the USAF. It gets used by governments around the world.

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Ubuntu Linux 6.06, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, fixed most security flaws in first year: Microsoft

A recent security analysis by Microsoft’s Jeffrey Jones shows that Ubuntu 6.06, in its first year, solved 92.6% of known security issues, leaving 7.4% unresolved.

The same analysis compares this to Windows Vista, showing that 45.5% of its known security issues have been left unresolved after one year, with only 54.5% patched thus far. This closely resembles the pattern from Windows XP, which resolved 54.6% of known security issues in its first year.

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